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Criminal Justice Management Conference

The 18th Criminal Justice Management Conference is a national event bringing together over 300 professionals in prison and probation services alongside police, central government and courts who, together, have a joint responsibility to shape current reform and the future direction of policy in the criminal justice system.

To secure your place while availability lasts, please visit www.cjm-conference.co.uk/registration and quote ‘CUST100’ on the booking page to receive £100 off.

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Abus Padlocks competition - Jonathan Low-Hang

We are giving away two sets of two top-quality padlocks, in conjunction with Nothing But Padlocks – suppliers of padlocks to the police.

The sets (the Abus 701B/45 – a brass, double-bolted padlock with a sealed lock body – and the smaller Abus 155/30, with combination for keyless entry) will be given away to two lucky readers.

Here, Jonathan Low-Hang from Nothing But Padlocks tells The Custodial Review about its top-quality locks.

Tell us about your business… 

Nothing But Padlocks has been trading online for nine years. We feel we are the leading specialist in padlock supply in the UK. 

We expect to provide further specialist advice to larger organisations such as the Met Police as well as the individual customer.

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Why Prisons Need Body Worn Cameras

Each year there are nearly 6000 reported incidents of assaults on prison officers within English and Welsh prisons, 700 of which resulted in serious injury last year. With figures of incidents rising by a third in 2016, the protection of staff and prisoners is high on the government’s agenda. 

Statistics from the Ministry of Justice indicate that prisoner-on-prisoner assaults have, too, risen by a third in the last year, prompting comments from past Justice Secretary Liz Truss around prison safety and reform, and from the Prison Reform Trust who printed that “people in prison, prisoners and staff, are less safe than they have been at any other point since records began.”

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video surveillance - Netwatch CIO Niall Kelly

Niall Kelly, CIO of Netwatch Group, discusses the relationship between prison standards and comprehensive video surveillance…

The capabilities of modern video surveillance technology are staggering. Across the prison estate, they are enabling occupational capacity with unprecedented standards of surveillance that go hand in hand with good governance and help to achieve the highest standards of control and safety.

Comprehensive monitoring makes the most of valuable human resources and mitigates the ever-present risks presented by overcrowding, violence, drug use and accusations of misconduct. Huge advances in digital signalling, video analytics, cloud processing, AI and deep learning are combining to enable proper stewardship of far-flung, secure areas.

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Custodial Facilities Forum

As a partner of the Custodial Facilities Forum, The Custodial Review are pleased to announce that you have chance to present at the event – where secure estates and facilities of the future will be the focus. 

The CFF are inviting submissions to present at the conference, which is being held on November 15 and 16 at Whittlebury Hall, Northants.

If you’re involved in the design, delivery or management of secure estates we’d be interested to hear about the following subject areas:
•    Facilities that meet the needs of an ageing prison population including accessibility and designing for dementia. 
•    Custodial facilities that keep both staff and those remanded safe. What’s the latest best practice, how can we reduce the risks of self-harm and protect staff?
•    Integrating rehabilitation and design, facilities of the future.
•    Balancing efficiency, performance and long term cost-effectiveness in modernising secure facilities
•    Innovations in the custodial sector – what can we learn and adopt from other countries, and other sectors such as mental health? 

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Self harm - inside a prison cell

Dr Danielle McDermott, Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychology at Leeds Trinity University, supported by co-author Dr Dominic Willmott, Research Fellow in Legal & Criminal Psychology at the University of Huddersfield, offer readers of The Custodial Review an academic insight in the rising problem of self-harm and violence in male prisons.

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Official statistics, published by the Ministry of Justice, show that 26,643 assault incidents were recorded in the 12 months to the end of March 2017 – a 20 per cent increase on the previous year. Assaults on staff rose by 32 per cent.

Serious assaults, including those requiring medical attention at hospital, have almost trebled in four years. There were 3,606 such incidents recorded during the 12 months to the end of March 2017 – a 22 per cent increase on the previous year.